What is a Short Sale?

  • What is HAFA?

  • What is a short sale?

    • What is a Short Sale Anyway? 
      An increase in foreclosure rates will inevitably bring with it an increase in short sales. But what is a short sale? 

      A short sale happens when you sell your house for less than your remaining mortgage balance, the proceeds of which go to the lender and in return the lender forgives the remaining balance. Selling your home as a short sale is one way to avoid foreclosure. 

      As a general rule, lenders lose money when they foreclose on a property. Consequently, they would rather not have to foreclose if it can be avoided. A short sale represents an opportunity to cut their losses because a short sale usually allows them to recoup more of the cost of the loan than a foreclosure process would. 

      However, don’t think that a short sale is an easy thing to accomplish. In order to get permission for a short sale, you must provide documentation showing a genuine financial hardship. And don’t think that the decision for accepting a short sale is solely in the hands of the lender. Sure the lender must first agree, but this is not the final word. If there is mortgage insurance involved, this company also gets input on the decision. If there is an investor backing the mortgage, they also get input as to whether to accept a short sale. 

      The transaction process for a short sale can be rather cumbersome as well, whether you’re on the buying or selling side. Many short sales fail due to additional demands by the lender, such as requiring the broker to reduce his or her commission and/or that the seller signs a document requiring him or her to pay back the shortfall. 

      If you’re on the selling side of a short sale, consider having your agent or other experienced professional negotiate with your lender for a better deal. And remember, if the lender does accept a short sale and forgives part of your debt, that is considered taxable income and you must declare it as such to the IRS. 
       
  • Ask Sandra

    • What are the differences between a condominium, a townhouse and a co-op? 
      A townhouse is a style of construction, whereas condominium and co-op are types of ownership. A townhouse is basically a building or unit that shares a common wall with the building or unit next door. The walls are usually straight and entry is usually from the ground floor. Townhouses usually have two or more stories. A townhouse can be a style of condominium. 

      A condo is where you own the actual structure of the building jointly with the other members of the association, along with common areas such as swimming pools, tennis courts or other common areas. Individually, you own the airspace and interior of the structure, but not the building itself. You and the other members of the association own the structure together. 

      A co-op is where you own shares of a corporation or organization that owns the larger structure, and ownership of those shares gives you the right to occupy a specific unit or apartment. 
       

DON'T MISS A NEW LISTING AGAIN!

Register Now
Already registered? Login

FREE AUTOMATED EMAIL UPDATES
Sign in to take advantage of all this site has to offer. Save your favorite listings and searches – also receive email updates when listings you like come on the market for free!
*Contact Information is NOT Shared*

Sandra Browning

Sandra Browning
Berkshire Hathaway Home Services - PenFed Realty
Gainesville, VA 20155

703-980-8710
Contact Me

Quick Search


view all


Any

Any

No Min.

No Max.



Sandra Browning | 703-980-8710 | Contact Me
13555 Wellington Center Circle, Suite 107 - Gainesville, VA 20155
Copyright © 2017, All Rights Reserved

house realtor mls

Real Estate Websites by iHOUSEweb iconiHOUSEweb | Admin Menu